Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.596522
Title: Electrodynamics of a charged Bose-gas
Author: Beere, W. H.
Awarding Body: University of Cambridge
Current Institution: University of Cambridge
Date of Award: 1997
Availability of Full Text:
Full text unavailable from EThOS.
Please contact the current institution’s library for further details.
Abstract:
This thesis is a comprehensive study of the charged Bose-gas (CBG). Special attention has been paid to the role of Bose-Einstein condensation, and it's effect on the superconducting properties of the system. The main motivation for this work has been the relevance of the CBG as a model for the high temperature superconductors, within the context of the bipolaron theory[1], the experimental and theoretical evidence for which is discussed in the introductory chapters. By using standard many body theory relevant properties of the CBG have been derived. Much attention has been placed on how to deal with the condensate in an interacting system. The Bogoliubov-de Gennes (BdG) equations are formulated for the Charged Bose Gas (CBG), and their extension to the Ginzburg-Landau-Abrikosov-Gor'kov (GLAG) type theory is discussed. The temperature dependence of the condensate density for the Coulomb Bose-gas (CBG) was studied using the Bogoliubov approximation. This enabled the calculation of the London penetration depth as a function of temperature. Other thermodynamic variables, such as the free energy and specific heat, were also calculated. The nature of the Bose-Einstein condensation of the CBG in a magnetic field was investigated for ultra-low temperatures and ultra-high magnetic fields. The temperature dependence of the upper critical field was found to have positive curvature, one of the remarkable features of the high temperature superconductors. The difference between the resistive transition and the peak in the specific heat is also discussed.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.596522  DOI: Not available
Share: