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Title: Measurement of optically generated charge with a Si delta-doped GaAs electrometry structure
Author: Baker, T. S. H.
Awarding Body: University of Cambridge
Current Institution: University of Cambridge
Date of Award: 2009
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Abstract:
GaAs is a light sensitive material, that optical as well as electronic components can be integrated onto a single device. This dissertation describes the fabrication and measurement of a novel photo detector, which incorporates both an intentionally designed optical absorption region with two nanowires transistor electrometers by trench isolation. The transistor electrometers operate as Single Electron Transistors at 4.2K and below. Above this, they operate as Conventional Field Effect Transistors. With optical irradiation focused on the absorption region, an applied bias separates the photo generated electron and hole. These migrate in the applied field towards the appropriate transistor electrometer for measurement. Two transistor electrometers were chosen, to see that if it was possible to derive noise benefit from correlating both transistors together. The ultimate goal of this would be for low noise single photon detection. Electrical characterization was performed at cryogenic temperatures. The application of low power unfocused irradiation onto a Single Electron Transistor, showed current steps with intensity. Even though this did not reach the single photon level, an average of 4.1 photons per pulse was regularly detectable. This was caused from the emptying of trapped charge in the single electron transistor nanowire. It is believed that with more sensitive measurement techniques, this method can be optimized for single photon detection.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.596279  DOI: Not available
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