Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.595490
Title: The institutional contexts of emerging markets and internationalisation strategy
Author: Alvi, F.
Awarding Body: University of Cambridge
Current Institution: University of Cambridge
Date of Award: 2009
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Abstract:
This dissertation puts forward a means of operationalising institutional context as a variable for emerging market strategy. Specifically, a typology for the institutional contexts of emerging markets is derived. As a starting point, a new analytical perspective is offered on the puzzle of why MNEs struggle to differentiate optimally between emerging markets in formulating internationalisation strategy. Miscued strategies are found to result in part from inadequate attention to differences in institutional context. This dissertation attempts to present institutional context as an actionable variable that can inform internationalisation strategy in emerging markets. A multi-level, multi-method approach is undertaken in three steps. First, as background, discourse analysis of the rhetoric around emerging markets reveals deep biases. It is found that broader contextual understanding of emerging markets may be limited by cognitive oversimplifications in our discourses; perception of institutional context is fractured, and an improved holistic approach is required. Second, a typology for the institutional contexts of emerging markets is formulated by analysing data from the diffusion of the Basel II Capital Accord in 16 countries in Eastern Europe, the Middle East, and Asia. Organisational responses to Basel II are measured across six dimensions as surrogate variables for institutional context. Institutional contexts are found to be reformist – instigative – disobliging – cosmetic. Finally, the typology is tested statistically for its internal and external reliability.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.595490  DOI: Not available
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