Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.595312
Title: The exploration of self-regulation and transfer anxiety within stroke patients transferred from a hyper acute stroke unit to a ward
Author: Brooke, Joanne
Awarding Body: London Metropolitan University
Current Institution: London Metropolitan University
Date of Award: 2013
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Abstract:
Stroke services provide patients with immediate assessment and treatment on a hyper acute stroke unit prior to being transferred for intense rehabilitation. Patients' experience of transfer from a hyper acute stroke unit has yet to be explored. A patient's beliefs regarding their illness are important factors that aid a patients' recovery yet these have not been fully explored in patients following a stroke. The aims of this study are to explore the patients' perspectives of transfer from a hyper acute stroke unit to a stroke unit and their itIness beliefs. Data were collected from a purposive sample of patients (n=6) on a stroke unit following transfer from a hyper acute stroke unit. Semi-structured interviews were carried out to explore patients' experience of transfer and their illness beliefs. The interview schedule was based on literature and interviews with a Clinical Nurse Specialist and a stroke patient. Data were analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA). The emergent super-ordinate themes included: disassociation from being in the world, search for understanding. strive for independence and acceptance of support, and hope and uncertainty. A chronic illness model of illness representation dimensions emerged; higher reporting of identity, consequences, and timel ine was associated with lower personal and treatment control and an emotional response. Self-regulatory coping strategies and health beliefs within patients following a stroke were identified as important constructs to include in healthcare assessments with the aim of improving psychological, physical and social outcomes.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.595312  DOI: Not available
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