Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.594688
Title: Managing mental health difficulties in higher education : the lived experience
Author: East, Carole Ann Margaret
Awarding Body: University of Nottingham
Current Institution: University of Nottingham
Date of Award: 2013
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Abstract:
1.6 million young people are currently in higher education (HEFCE, 2010). Even though participation ‘stands at 57% for the 20% most advantaged ... compared to 19% for the most disadvantaged 20%’( Inside Government, 2011), this is an increasingly diverse population. Among the attendant pressures for both students and staff, mental health concerns predominate: since the Royal College of Psychiatrists published their first report into the mental health of students, (RCP, 2003), the issues ‘highlighted have shown no signs of abating and in many respects have become more pressing’ (RCP. 2011:17). Universities for their part increasingly seek to address students’ mental health needs, thereby supporting successful completion of their studies. This doctoral research examines the experiences of ‘home’ undergraduate students in one Russell Group university (henceforth anonymised as Midlands University) and the staff who support them. A qualitative approach serves to highlight the voices of participants and offer an in-depth account of their lived experience of access to, and participation in, the social and academic life of the University. Social Capital theory, Emotional Geographies and the Capability Approach provide a theoretical framework for the analysis of interview data. Key findings confirm the ongoing impact of stigma and discrimination, and indicate the importance of the affective domain of education and the role of student culture on support experiences. The overall aim of this study was to improve student and staff experiences of support. The findings have been and continue to be used to inform policy and practice within the study University.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.594688  DOI: Not available
Keywords: RC 321 Neuroscience. Biological psychiatry. Neuropsychiatry ; LB2300 Higher education
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