Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.594197
Title: The internationalisation of higher education: transformation and exploitation
Author: Stewart, Yvonne
Awarding Body: Canterbury Christ Church University
Current Institution: Canterbury Christ Church University
Date of Award: 2011
Availability of Full Text:
Full text unavailable from EThOS.
Please contact the current institution’s library for further details.
Abstract:
This thesis is about the internationalisation of higher education, and the ideologies and values that drive and underpin it. Since the inception of higher education, there has been a range of international, national, I institutional and individual academic responses to the shifting culture of universities over time and in different contexts. In this work, external and internal factors are explored to identify the values and ideologies that influence the internationalisation of higher education in the process of continual global change. Taking a critical humanist perspective the thesis concludes that the influence of economic globalisation has spread through the university sector in the guise of the internationalisation process. As such the hidden power of supranational organisations has been instrumental in influencing fundamental changes in the rationale for higher education on a global scale. Political and economic pressures have been brought to bear that could challenge the character of universities, by encouraging a bias towards income generation. This thesis offers a triptique that includes the human dimension based on a range of contested and contradictory perceptions, values and international practices. It also exposes the academe's , culpability in promoting a particular response to economic globalisation, which takes little account of the cosmopolitan demands of the twenty-first century polycentric dynamic.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.594197  DOI: Not available
Share: