Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.593478
Title: A unifying framework for model reduction by least-squares Padé
Author: Smith, I. D.
Awarding Body: University of Aberdeen
Current Institution: University of Aberdeen
Date of Award: 1998
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Abstract:
A thorough review of the literature on the model reduction of linear, time-invariant, dynamical systems in both the frequency and time domains is presented. Particular attention is paid to the least-squares extension of the classical method of Padé approximation. An account is given of the development of apparently different approaches of least-squares parameter-matching Padé model reduction applied to continuous-time and discrete-time systems. These approaches are shown to be related via a unifying theory. From the formulation it is possible to show several interesting features of the least-squares approach which lead to a fuller understanding of exactly how the reduced model approximates the full system. An error index is derived in the general continuous-time case and it is shown that a range of system parameter preservation options are available. Using the theory developed in the continuous-time case a non-uniqueness property of the method is proven. An 'optimal' least-squares method based on the approach and the introduction of weighting for the system parameters are both investigated. The unifying theory is extended to the discrete-time case where an important new stability preservation property is proved and is shown to provide the basis for a new least-squares Padé method. This method uses transformations between the z- and s-planes to guarantee stable reduced order models approximating stable high order continuous-time systems. The application of least-squares Padé approximation is further extended to the multivariable case with particular attention given to the factors affecting the levels of order reduction achieved. Appropriate numerical examples are used to illustrate the main points of the thesis and graphs of the impulse and step responses are used throughout to visually highlight the accuracy of approximation.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.593478  DOI: Not available
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