Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.593112
Title: Studies on manganese cycling in forest soils
Author: Michopoulos, P.
Awarding Body: University of Aberdeen
Current Institution: University of Aberdeen
Date of Award: 1994
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Abstract:
An assessment of manganese distribution in podzols, brown earth, gley, and peat soils in NE Scotland showed that most of the manganese was in a form unavailable to plants (residual manganese). Among the available forms, exchangeable manganese in litter had by far the largest concentration. The percentage of total manganese in the exchangeable form in forest soils was found to have a very good correlation with organic matter concentration. Manganese oxides made a negligible contribution to the available manganese pool. It is believed that their supply is limited due to dissolution. Heather litter was found to contain larger concentrations of total manganese than forest litter. However, exchangeable manganese is lost easier from heather litter than forest litter, probably through leaching. A slow equilibration technique was applied to obtain Langmuir adsorption isotherms for manganese in simulated throughfall and Sitka spruce litter. It showed that the maximum adsorption capacity of litter reached a value of many thousands mg kg-1. Competition between hydrogen and manganese ions in simulated throughfall for adsorption sites on Sitka spruce litter was examined. It was found that the more acid treatments can leach significantly more manganese; however, exchangeable manganese is influenced by manganese concentration in throughfall and can increase in concentration proportionally to the manganese content in throughfall. It is believed that this is a defensive mechanism against excess manganese leaching from litter. A simulated acid rain experiment involving reconstituted soil profiles and young Sitka spruce trees was set up to investigate manganese fluxes and manganese cycling in the microcosms thus created.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.593112  DOI: Not available
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