Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.593109
Title: The role of intestinal helminth parasites in the population ecology of wood mice, Apodemus sylvaticus L. in deciduous woodland
Author: Mfune, John Kazgeba Elijah
Awarding Body: University of Aberdeen
Current Institution: University of Aberdeen
Date of Award: 1999
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Abstract:
The aim of the study was to investigate the role of helminth parasites in the population ecology of the wood mouse Apodemus sylvaticus in the field. Specifically, the study determined the species richness, prevalence and intensity of helminths in wood mice in deciduous woodland at Balmedie, Aberdeenshire, North East Scotland and evaluated faecal egg counting technique for detecting and estimating worm burdens of helminths in wood mice. In a capture-mark-recapture field experiment both the prevalence and intensity of helminths were manipulated by administering the anthelmintics Levamisole and Praziquantel to wood mice in deciduous woodland (Foveran and Auchmacoy, Aberdeenshire). Wood mice captured in Balmedie woodland harboured 3 species of nematode, Heligmosomoides polygyrus, Syphacia stroma and Trichuris muris, the digenean Brachylaemus recurvum and 2 species of cestode Skrjabinotaenia labota and a larval strobilocercus of Taenia taeniaeformis. Frequency distributions of all helminths other than T. muris and T. taeniaeformis, displayed over-dispersion. The prevalence and intensity of infection of the helminths showed a clear pattern of seasonal variation. There were no significant differences in the prevalence and intensity of infection of helminths between male and female wood mice. The intensity of infection of H. polygyrus and S. stroma was higher in heavier (older) mice. Wood mice underwent seasonal variation in density at both Foveran and Auchmacoy woodlands. The density of mice was greatest in late autumn/early winter and declined through the spring, being lowest in late spring / early summer. The density increased throughout summer and was highest in later summer / early autumn at Auchmacoy and in early winter at Foveran. At each site, the population density was similar in control and heated grids. Adult male and female wood mice showed a clear pattern of seasonal variation in mean body weight at both study sites. The mean body weights were highest in summer, declined through autumn being lowest in late autumn and early winter. There were no significant seasonal (breeding vs non-breeding) and treatment (control vs treatment) effects on the mean body weights of adult male and female wood mice.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.593109  DOI: Not available
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