Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.593017
Title: The isolation and characterisation of anaerobic cellulolytic bacteria from estuarine sediment
Author: Madden, R. H.
Awarding Body: University of Aberdeen
Current Institution: University of Aberdeen
Date of Award: 1979
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Abstract:
This project set out to isolate and characterise anaerobic cellulolytic bacteria from the estuarine sediments of the River Don in Aberdeenshire. The project developed one aspect of a previous, more general study of the microbiology of the Don estuary. Initial studies showed the media used to be unsuitable for the purpose of isolating pure cultures, as did the methodology for the preparation of the anaerobic media. The methodology for the preparation of the media, and the composition of the media were therefore modified. Using the improved media prepared by the modified methodology successful techniques for the isolation of pure cultures of anaerobic, cellulolytic bacteria were developed. Nine pure cultures of anaerobic, cellulolytic bacteria were isolated: eight from the estuarine sediments of the River Don and one from a sample of marine, sediment taken from the North Sea All were characterised as members of'the genus Clostridium. One isolate was characterised as a new species and was provisionally named Clostridium papyrosolvens in view of its "paper-dissolving" properties. No other isolates were sufficiently characterised to enable their identification as species. A field test lasting for one year showed that the improved solid medium was significantly superior to that used in the previous study for the enumeration of anaerobic cellulolytic bacteria from the estuarine sediments of the River Don. Based on the results obtained during a yearlong study of the estuarine sediments of the River Don a hypothesis for the regulation of microbial activity in the sediment was proposed. This hypothesis was that the movement of solutes in the sediment was principally by diffusion and hence the microbial activity of the sediments was also regulated by diffusion.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.593017  DOI: Not available
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