Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.593002
Title: The structure and function of ventral papillae of notocotylids (Digenea), especially Notocotylus triserialis, Diesing 1839
Author: MacKinnon, B. M.
Awarding Body: University of Aberdeen
Current Institution: University of Aberdeen
Date of Award: 1980
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Abstract:
Notocotylus triserialis is a digenean parasite of the caeca of fresh water ducks and bears three rows of eversible papillae on its ventral surface. The structure and function of these papillae were investigated. Each papilla is composed of 50-60 pyriform cells which contain many mitochondria. Body musculature is well developed, especially in the papillar area and ducts of the excretory system enter every papilla. Histochemical tests showed the presence of protein, lipid and haemoglobin and the absence of carbohydrate, acid mucopolysaccharide and phosphatases. Many respiratory enzymes were localized in the papillar cells. Analysis of the four haemoglobin of N. triserialis show them to be spectrally similar to the two haemoglobins of their chicken host, but electrophoretically different. The haemoglobin of the worm are able to oxygenate and deoxygenate in vitro. Radioactive labelling experiments indicate that the papillae are not specialized in the uptake of 3H-glucose or 3H-leucine in vitro. In vivo labelling of chicken blood indicated that the haemoglobin ingested by the worm is broken down at the gut epithelium and that the globin portion of the worm's haemoglobin may be synthesized de novo. Developmental studies showed the greatest rate of growth of the papillae, as indicated by number and size of constituent cells, to be between days 8 and 9 post infection, which corresponds to the time of onset of egg production by the parasite. Respiration experiments indicated that N. triserialis builds up an oxygen debt when maintained anaerobically and is very sensitive to cyanide. It is suggested that the ventral papillae function in respiration.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.593002  DOI: Not available
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