Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.592031
Title: Operations of dialogue : communicative action and the formation of the dialogical actor
Author: Taylor, Linda
Awarding Body: Manchester Metropolitan University
Current Institution: Manchester Metropolitan University
Date of Award: 2013
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Abstract:
This thesis seeks to develop a conceptual framework for the creation and analysis of contemporary performance practice which draws from Jurgen Habermas's theories of communicative action and the public sphere. A consideration of political theory (notably Habermas) and critics of Habermas's work is combined with the construction of a performance making method. Operations of Dialogue is the name of both this performance making method and the resulting performance completed in September 2006. This process was structured to facilitate the particular negotiation of the performance material by the performers, identified in this work by the term' dialogical actors'. The performance of Operations of Dialogue foregrounds its own making processes as a primary subject of the staged performance work. Its content was compiled and managed by the performers themselves who selected, edited and refmed the performance material. The thesis offers a detailed overview and analysis of the making process and performance, reflecting on the actors' learning processes and the resonances with Habennasian theories of communicative action and the public sphere. This thesis is accompanied by the DVD of the performance of Operations of Dialogue which the reader is encouraged to watch before reading the writing. The thesis sets out a theoretical framework for the analysis which looks at various dimensions of Habennasian theory in relation to contemporary contexts and performance practices. This includes: the relationship to ideology critique, through comparisons with the work of Augusto Boal and Forced Entertainment; the relevance of the public sphere for political performance and the University context; and the interaction between communicative action and forms of verbatim performance. This latter section in particular considers theorists, including Crossley, White and Gilligan whose work challenges and extends the principles of Habermasian dialogue in theatrically relevant directions.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.592031  DOI: Not available
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