Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.590993
Title: A theory of dysfunctionality : the European micro-states as dysfunctional states in the international system
Author: Simpson, Archie William
Awarding Body: University of Aberdeen
Current Institution: University of Aberdeen
Date of Award: 2007
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Abstract:
This study is concerned with European micro-states and their continual survival in the international system. Micro-states are sovereign states with populations up to one million people. The existence of micro-states raises a number of serious questions involving the granting of statehood, recognition of sovereignty and the ability of micro-states to maintain their presence in the international system. The study begins with some background into small state theories, writings on micro-states and debates concerning sovereignty. It is argued that being sovereign members of the international system does not fully explain the extantism of the micro-states but that a functional account can. A theory of disfunctionality is outlined prior to a review of empirical evidence in support of this framework. It is argued that a functional account of the state is central to the survival of European micro-states. In particular, it is suggested that micro-states ‘contract-out’ important state functions to others in the international system to ensure their continued survival. From this proposition, a theory of disfunctionality is outlined. This theory incorporates a functional matrix of statehood, the impact of small size upon states, dependency upon others and that the logic of appropriateness is in play for the micro-states. The conclusion indicates that it is possible to identify three types of states in the contemporary system: functional states, dysfunctional states and non-functioning states. The final part of the study also suggests that the question of statehood is somewhat erratic and that a proliferation of micro-states may be expected in the 21st century.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.590993  DOI: Not available
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