Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.590958
Title: Incidence and prognosis of parkinsonism in North East Scotland : a pilot study
Author: Taylor, K. S. M.
Awarding Body: University of Aberdeen
Current Institution: University of Aberdeen
Date of Award: 2006
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Abstract:
The thesis begins with a review of the epidemiological study of Parkinson’s disease (PD), and in particular the features of the condition that make its study challenging, such as its insidious onset, diagnostic uncertainty and the older age group of those most commonly affected. Three systematic reviews are reported, which were performed as background to the original research. The thesis then describes the original research work undertaken. Firstly we performed a community-based, prospective incidence study, using multiple sources to identify patients with newly diagnosed parkinsonism from a population of 148 600 people in the North-East of Scotland, over a period of 18 months. Eighty-two incident patients were identified, of whom 50 had probable PD. The crude incidence of PD was 22.4/100 000/year (95% confidence interval 16.6, 29.6) with an age-standardised male:female ratio of 2.30 (95% confidence interval 1.55, 3.28), and the mean age of onset was 76.1 years (standard deviation 10.0). The incident cohort is now undergoing long-term follow-up. The methods developed were generally successful. Provisionally we found a higher incidence of PD than most other comparable studies, and our patients were considerably older, which probably reflects better case ascertainment in the elderly. As part of the incidence study, we performed two community screening projects, to identify patients in the study population with previously undiagnosed parkinsonism. These studies concluded that, although only 0.3% and 0.4% of those screened were found to have previously undiagnosed parkinsonism, (meaning screening is not worthwhile in clinical practice) the numbers were sufficient to increase significantly the incidence of parkinsonism, suggesting that some form of screening should be considered in future incidence studies of PD.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (M.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.590958  DOI: Not available
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