Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.590017
Title: The meaning of mattering : a study of the Every Child Matters initiative in four secondary schools
Author: Jakes, Amanda Irene Angela
Awarding Body: University of Brighton
Current Institution: University of Brighton
Date of Award: 2012
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Abstract:
The government initiative Every Child Matters was introduced in 2003 in the wake of a number of high profile cases of the abuse and deaths of children. Every Child Matters was identified as an educational responsibility and its philosophy represented the convergence of a number of developments that are explored in the opening chapters of this study. The central concern here is the delivery of Every Child Matters and this is examined through the processes of legitimation, formulation, adaptation and mediation. Particular reference is made to the role played by teachers of religious studies, citizenship and personal, social, health and economic education. The initial fieldwork was conducted by structured interview and in the subsequent phase an unstructured mode was employed in a sample of four schools. A distinctive characteristic of the method practised was the voice given to the participants. Social constructionism is the theoretical tradition within which the data were interpreted. This tradition has been practised by Robert Jackson within religious studies and was the method adopted within this study. There emerged five significant themes, identified in the thesis as Incorporation, Invisible matter, Inclusion, The mentor's role and The climate of the classroom. It was found that the prevailing concept of Every Child Matters, mediated by teachers had undergone a character change since 2003; it is recognisable but not attributable to the original vision. It is an irony that a measure to make children safe claims little security for itself. The emergent implications include the need to protect initiatives within schools, the hazards of transient fashions and vocabulary, the benefit of teachers' instincts to adapt initiatives and introduce new ideas and the need to address student well-being in initial and in-service training.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.590017  DOI: Not available
Keywords: X000 Education
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