Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.589717
Title: An investigation into the differential diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder and attachment difficulties
Author: Kendall-Jones, Rowan
ISNI:       0000 0004 5346 7165
Awarding Body: University of Birmingham
Current Institution: University of Birmingham
Date of Award: 2014
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Abstract:
This study reviews the evidence for commonalities in the behavioural presentation and functioning of children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and attachment difficulties. A comparative analysis was conducted to evaluate current practice, assess the scale of misdiagnosis, and identify areas of differential presentation. Teacher-ratings of the frequency of behaviours were collected for two groups of primary school children matched for age, sex and school: one with recent diagnoses of ASD (n = 12) and a control group without diagnoses (n = 12). Three children with ASD diagnoses had higher ratings for attachment difficulties than ASD, at a level approaching significance. However, within-group analysis showed no significant difference between the median ASD and attachment difficulties ratings in the group with ASD diagnoses. A between-group comparison revealed significantly more behaviour suggestive of attachment difficulties in the ASD. Finally, the measure, based on ‘The Coventry Grid’ (Moran, 2010), was found to have acceptable reliability and good face and content validity. However, while the literature suggested good construct validity, analysis of dimensionality raised questions about how we construe the aetiology and mechanisms that constitute the phenomenology that informs the diagnosis of ASD and attachment difficulties. Implications for the ASD diagnostic process are discussed.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.App.Ed.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.589717  DOI: Not available
Keywords: BF Psychology ; LC Special aspects of education
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