Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.589487
Title: Sacrament as interruption : an analysis of the sacramental theology of Eberhard Jüngel
Author: Nelson, Robert David
Awarding Body: University of Aberdeen
Current Institution: University of Aberdeen
Date of Award: 2011
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Abstract:
While German Lutheran theologian Eberhard Jüngel (1934-) has made a number of significant contributions to contemporaneous discussions of sacramental theology, this topic has largely been ignored by interpreters of his thought. This study adds to the field of research into Jüngel's theology by summarizing and evaluating, through a close reading of pertinent primary and secondary source materials, his approach to the problem of sacrament. The study is divided into four units that correspond to the major themes that emerge in Jüngel's sacramental theology. The first unit considers Jüngel's interesting claim that the word of God (and, in a certain qualified sense, the human word) functions sacramentally as it addresses its hearer. Part II consists of an analysis of Jüngel's oftstated assertion that Jesus Christ is the unique and preeminent sacrament of God for the world. The third unit explores Jüngel's ecclesiology, and makes transparent his interesting approach to the question of the church's sacramentality. The fourth unit investigates Jüngel's doctrines of baptism and the Lord's Supper, and includes a hermeneutical proposal for reading his texts on these doctrines. Throughout this four-part analysis, the study demonstrates that Jüngel consistently appeals to the category of ‘interruption' for describing God's sacramental relation to the world and its actualities. While containing a number of appreciative remarks on this description, the study concludes that the hegemony of the category of ‘interruption' in Jüngel's theology of sacrament raises important questions concerning its coherence and tenability.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.589487  DOI: Not available
Keywords: Sacraments
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