Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.589111
Title: Psycho-social perspectives on living and working with violence in distressed and traumatised (dis-)organisations
Author: Scanlon, Christopher
Awarding Body: University of the West of England, Bristol
Current Institution: University of the West of England, Bristol
Date of Award: 2013
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Abstract:
The published work presented in this submission examines the nature and form of psychosocial processes that lead towards and away from mental health, social security and community and organisational cohesion. It demonstrates the application of psychosocial research methods to the problem of living and working with violence in a range of clinical and educational settings. The emergent work is described in 14 pieces of work; 8 peer-reviewed articles, 4 book chapters and 2 edited volumes. Each of these pieces of work is accompanied by short discussion and commentary on its impact and dissemination. The published work presented extends over a 15 year period and demonstrates learning derived from a 30 year professional and academic commitment to an in-depth exploration of the ways in which structural and cultural processes of inclusion/exclusion give rise to personal and interpersonal violence that poses significant risks of psychosocial harm. The work also explores the reciprocal nature of the violence played out between ‘identified clients’, the systems of care tasked with helping them and the wider society from whom these systems of care take their authority. A central concern of the presented work is to consider the often distressing and traumatising ways in which this reciprocal structural and behavioural violence impacts frontline workers and teams that comprise these organisations. The submission also draws upon psychosocial, group analytic, systems psychodynamic and educational theories of practice, to explore the ways in which reflective practice and team development interventions may be deployed to equip multi-disciplinary teams with the necessary resilience and reflective capacity to work with this psychosocial violence in more creative, thoughtful and collaborative ways. The impact of the published work and the implication for future professional clinical, educational and consultancy practice is also discussed.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.589111  DOI: Not available
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