Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.588643
Title: Distribution of landslides and geotechnical properties within the Hampshire Basin
Author: Yuangdetkla, Kwanjai
Awarding Body: University of Portsmouth
Current Institution: University of Portsmouth
Date of Award: 2013
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Abstract:
The Paleogene succession in the Hampshire Basin, southern England is poorly described in terms of its engineering properties.The nature and distribution of landslides across the basin is also poorly described. This thesis describes work carried out to better understand the engineering properties of the Paleogene succession and how this affects landsliding in the region. A new engineering stratigraphy for the Paleogene strata of the Hampshire Basin has been constructed by collating available geological and geotechnical data, including examination of available exposures, database information, published and non-published literature. Similarly landslides across the basin were examined by field mapping, image interpretation and literature review and a new landslide inventory was produced. This new stratigraphy was utilised in a basin wide model of landslide occurrence using an infinite slope based methodology in a GIS. This new model was used to improve the landslide inventory, resulting in the identification of a total of 429 new landslides, a threefold increase on previous knowledge. Results indicate that landslide identification may be greatly enhanced if a geotechnical model is incorporated in the investigation. The research shows that it is appropriate to construct geological models based upon an engineering stratigraphy. For this study area, this model was tested by its incorporation into a slope stability analysis that could then be tested against the results of image interpretation and field surveys. This could be important for other studies where geotechnical information may be incomplete or where it is difficult to collect new data. This may have important implications for similar studies elsewhere.
Supervisor: Gibson, Andrew David ; Whitworth, Malcolm Christopher Zordan Sponsor: Department of Mineral Resources, Royal Thai Government
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Thesis
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.588643  DOI: Not available
Keywords: Earth Sciences ; Environmental Sciences
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