Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.586803
Title: Prospective study of the mental ill-health of adults with intellectual disabilities : outcomes and predictive determinants
Author: Muir, Amanda
Awarding Body: University of Glasgow
Current Institution: University of Glasgow
Date of Award: 2013
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Abstract:
Background: The prevalence of mental ill-health and problem behaviour within the intellectually disabled population is reported to range from 30 to 50%. However, the longer term outcomes of mental ill-health and problem behaviour, such as persistence, new onset, remission and resilience, are unknown. Accordingly, the factors predictive of such outcomes are also unknown. Aims: To determine the long term outcomes of mental ill-health and problem behaviour, and the factors predictive of and associated with such outcomes, over a 10 year time-period in a cohort of adults with mild to profound intellectual disabilities. Method: A population-based cohort of adults with intellectual disabilities (n=100) was investigated at three time points over a 10 year period. Data were collected using a range of measures. Descriptive statistics were derived and regression analyses performed to determine factors predictive of outcomes. Results: The rate of psychopathology was found to have increased in the cohort over the 10 year period. Factors predictive of this increase were experiencing an angry interaction and trusting to share a secret with only one person, or anyone. The majority of the cohort experienced episodic mental ill-health, with relapse being predicted by being female and experiencing life events. New onset of mental ill-health was predicted by experiencing life events, and resilience was predicted by not experiencing life events and having urinary continence. Problem behaviours were persistent in 50%, with 50% remitting. New onset of problem behaviours was predicted by not experiencing life events, and resilience was predicted by having mild intellectual disabilities, not experiencing an angry interaction and having more than one close friend. Small but significant negative correlations were found between psychopathology and participation in social, leisure, and peer activities. Findings should be interpreted with caution due to the small sample size. Conclusions: The present study is the only existing longitudinal investigation following an adult cohort with mild to profound intellectual disabilities, at several time points over a 10 year period. Therefore, future research is needed to confirm findings. Given the increase in psychopathology, more effective monitoring, treatment and intervention is needed.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.586803  DOI: Not available
Keywords: BF Psychology ; R Medicine (General)
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