Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.584979
Title: Motivational and emotional dynamics of social values
Author: Cheung, Wing-yee
Awarding Body: Cardiff University
Current Institution: Cardiff University
Date of Award: 2010
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Abstract:
This research examined theoretical and emotional interrelations among social values, emotion, and action. Data from nine experiments revealed some novel and important findings. Experiments 1 to 3 examined the motivational dynamics of values by observing the effects of priming motivationally opposing values on judgment and behaviour. The results showed that priming tradition values reduced the better-than-average effect, but priming stimulation values increased it. Also, priming security values increased cleanliness behaviour, but priming self-direction values decreased it. Similarly, security values decreased curiosity behaviours, but priming self-direction values increased it. These findings supported the circular model's assumption about motivational interconnections between values. Experiments 4-9 examined the motivational dynamics of values by observing the effects of priming emotion on the importance of motivationally opposing values. Three types of negative emotion were primed: sadness, disgust, and shame. The results revealed that the context of the emotions determined their effect on values. Experiments 4 and 5 found that death-related sadness (e.g., passing away of a family member), but not failure-related sadness, led to increased importance of self-transcendence values (e.g., helpfulness) and decreased importance of self-enhancement values (e.g., self-success). Experiments 6 and 7 found that moral disgust (e.g., terrorists), but not hygiene disgust, led to increased importance of self-transcendence values and decreased importance of self-enhancement values. Experiment 8 found that moral shame, but not performance shame, led to increased importance of conservation values (e.g., conformity) and decreased importance of openness to change values (e.g., independence). Experiment 9 found that the context of shame interacts with prior individual differences to shape values and that these effects extend to value-relevant behaviour. Together, these findings provide novel support for important assumptions about motivational interconnections between values, while connecting these assumptions to extant evidence regarding the effects of goal and value priming on action and to evidence regarding the effects of emotion on social judgment and action. In addition, the results provide novel evidence in support of the importance of emotion appraisal processes in value-relevant judgment and behaviour.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.584979  DOI: Not available
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