Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.584656
Title: Legal and moral aspects of human embryonic stem cell research
Author: Hammond-Browning, Natasha Louise
Awarding Body: Cardiff University
Current Institution: Cardiff University
Date of Award: 2009
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Abstract:
This thesis is concerned with two different aspects of human embryonic stem cell research: legal and moral. These are not two distinct areas the law cannot regulate this controversial area of science without the input of morality. There is not one moral viewpoint on the use of human embryos in scientific research and as such this thesis discusses several different moral viewpoints before moving on to consider how the law takes into account these wide ranging and diverse stances. The science of human embryonic stem cell research is discussed briefly so as to ensure that the reader comprehends the science that the law is seeking to regulate and over which there is so much ethical debate. The majority of this thesis then considers the legal aspects of human embryonic stem cell research. The focus is upon the human embryo and human embryonic stem cell interface how the legislation which governs human embryo research has been used to subsequently regulate human embryonic stem cell research. The examination of the legal aspects of human embryonic stem cell research starts with a historical chapter on how the legislation came into force. This is necessary so as to understand how and why we regulate human embryonic stem cell research as we do and what the legislation does, before moving onto the finer detail. The role of research ethics committees, the HFEA and the UK Stem Cell Bank in human embryonic stem cell research are all analysed in depth, problem areas highlighted and solutions suggested. An analytical discussion of the reform process which led to the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 2008 is the last step in the examination of the regulation of human embryonic stem cell research. Finally comparisons are made to the State of California, USA which was the first US state to permissively fund stem cell research. The law stated is correct as of the 13th November 2008 when the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 2008 received Royal Assent.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.584656  DOI: Not available
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