Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.584218
Title: On the investigation of alcohol synthesis via the Fischer Tropsch reaction
Author: Zhao, Yanjun
Awarding Body: Cardiff University
Current Institution: Cardiff University
Date of Award: 2007
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Abstract:
The Fischer Tropsch (FT) reaction is hydrogenation of carbon oxides (mainly carbon monoxide) to produce hydrocarbons and alcohols. The produced alcohols can be used as substitutes to motor fuel or as fuel additives to enhance the octane number. The use of alcohols significantly reduces the environment related pollution. This thesis was aimed to investigate the alcohol synthesis via the FT reaction. Cobalt molybdenum based catalyst and cobalt copper based mixed oxide catalyst are two patented catalyst systems for alcohol synthesis. This study investigated the preparation and evaluation of these two catalyst systems. The highest activity (30% CO conversion) and alcohol yield (methanol: 8% higher alcohols: 13%) was obtained with an operation condition of 580 K, 75 bar, GHSV = 1225 h-1 and syngas ratio of 2 for cobalt molybdenum based catalyst. Carbon monoxide hydrogenation to synthesize alcohol was also investigated over gold containing catalyst. When ZnO was used as a support, it was found that the addition of gold could shift the alcohol distribution towards higher alcohol side. The carbon monoxide and hydrogen used for the FT reaction is mainly generated by steam reforming reaction. This thesis investigated the possibility of combining the steam reforming reaction and the FT reaction together. Ruthenium supported catalysts were investigated for this purpose. The obtained results demonstrate that both steam reforming and the FT alcohol synthesis can be performed over the same catalyst in the same reactor.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.584218  DOI: Not available
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