Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.582353
Title: New approaches to protein crystallization
Author: Silver, Barry R.
Awarding Body: University of Warwick
Current Institution: University of Warwick
Date of Award: 2013
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Abstract:
This thesis was focussed toward providing new approaches to protein crystallization. Herein, we describe three new such approaches. Firstly, we describe proof-of-concept studies which demonstrate that simple DC electrochemical systems may be used to enhance and/or control the growth of lysozyme protein crystals on the surface of platinum disc electrodes. Secondly, we demonstrate how various oil/water interfaces provide both novel and unique environments for the study and enhancement of protein crystallization studies. In particular, we show how some oil/water interfaces greatly enhance the extent of lysozyme crystallization in comparison to the air/water interface whilst others do not. Thirdly, we show for the first time, that by application of small magnitude potentials to the ITIES, large increases in lysozyme crystal growth can be achieved (on the ITIES) in short time. Additionally, and unrelated to protein crystallization, we find that large potential-dependent changes in surface tension may be achieved by probable reversible adsorption/desorption of proteins to and from the oil-water interface. The reversible changes in droplet geometry are, in some cases, large and seem controllable. As such, this methodology warrants consideration as means to enhance the performance of alternative liquid/liquid ultra low-voltage and conventional electrowetting systems. The rapid crystallization of TBATPB at the ITIES is also reported for the first time. This work is of importance to theory and experiment regarding ion-transfer mechanisms at the ITIES. Additionally, this work may point towards a new type of crystallization technology for a variety of molecules grounded in methodology developed for liquid/liquid electrochemical systems.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.582353  DOI: Not available
Keywords: QD Chemistry
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