Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.581943
Title: Works in sound and pattern synthesis : folio of works
Author: Fell, Mark
Awarding Body: University of Surrey
Current Institution: University of Surrey
Date of Award: 2013
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Abstract:
An integrated portfolio of writings, music and audio-visual works that responds to aesthetic, technical and critical concerns encounter in the production of the portfolio. The written component initially considers the relationship between technical tools and creative practices, and then considers how temporality is constructed and treated in computer music softwares. In a series of commentaries, I show how these issues are both derived from and feature within a number of works contained here. The works are grouped into 3 sections: audio-visual works, microtemporal works, and works responding to house musics; a 4th further section 'three exhibitions' is included in the appendices. The works, produced between 2008 and 2013, explore various vocabularies and materials using sound synthesis and pattern generating procedures. Of particular interest is the relationship between temporality, image, sound and geometry; how works are encountered by the audience; and, the role of works as critical exegesis of the musical and technical histories within which they are embedded. The development and structure of each work is documented, and analysis of each is presented. In response to the folio a number of theoretical concerns are identified and articulated. A description of creative process based upon a distinction between thought, technology and practice is critiqued and alternatives are drawn from Heidegger's analysis of 'Being-in-the-world', Latour's account of action as constituted in networks of humans and non-humans, and Clark and Chalmers' extended mind hypothesis. Developing from this I offer a reading of the role of music in Husserl's account of temporality and suggest that music has a time-constituting function.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.581943  DOI: Not available
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