Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.580407
Title: 'The splendour and beauty of truth' : John Rogers Herbert, R. A. (1810-1890)
Author: Langham, Nancy Marie
Awarding Body: Oxford Brookes University
Current Institution: Oxford Brookes University
Date of Award: 2012
Availability of Full Text:
Full text unavailable from EThOS. Restricted access.
Please contact the current institution’s library for further details.
Abstract:
John Rogers Herbert (1810-1890) is hardly ever mentioned in the various histories of nineteenth- century art, yet he was considered one of the most important artists of his time. During his sixty- year career, Herbert was admired by his colleagues, the press and public for his strong narrative ability and high ideals of art. Herbert's oeuvre demonstrates accomplished technique in many genres of painting. He began as a renowned portraitist, expanded into romantic and poetical dramas, history painting, orientalist scenes, landscapes and seascapes. His reputation was assured when he found himself among the artists favoured with fresco commissions at the New Palace of Westminster. However, the paintings for which he is best known are the biblical scenes he set in the real landscape of the East. These he infused with devout ideas of ideal sacred art, attempting to create a new visual expression of Catholicism for Victorian England. The object of this PhD is to re-establish Herbert into the story of Victorian painting; to examine his contribution to the Royal Academy and wider art circles, and how his Catholicism influenced his work. This thesis contains the first extensive biography ever written about Herbert, placing his life and work in context. His career is examined in detail, with special consideration of his impact on the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood and his important commissions at the New Palace of Westminster. also investigate his philosophy of art: his fascination with the East and his role as a Catholic influenced his sacred painting. Herbert's sacred art is truly 'Catholic', and this is contrasted to Victorian Protestant notions of sacred art, using various primary sources.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.580407  DOI: Not available
Share: