Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.579611
Title: Increasing protein consumption in older adults : facilitators, barriers, and practical solutions
Author: Best, Rachael L.
Awarding Body: Queen's University Belfast
Current Institution: Queen's University Belfast
Date of Award: 2012
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Abstract:
Dietary protein requirements are believed to increase with age. Yet older adults often fail to meet the dietary requirements for protein. Few studies have investigated reasons for inadequate protein intake in free-living older adults, or tried to increase protein intake within this population. Therefore the aim of this research was to investigate potential facilitators, barriers, and practical solutions to increasing protein consumption in older adults. These aims were addressed using a number of different research methodologies. Numerous facilitators and barriers to consumption of high-protein foods were identified using focus groups with free-living older adults. A questionnaire was designed to determine the relevant importance of facilitators and barriers identified in the focus groups in relation to frequency of consumption of high-protein foods. Based on the results of these studies and previous research, three factors were selected for further investigation in relation to protein consumption in older adults. These were; taste, texture, and knowledge and beliefs about protein. Taste was investigated by comparing the effects of seasonings and sauces added to meals on protein intake. Texture was investigated by manipulating the texture of meat and comparing the effects of perceived texture of meat on protein intake. Knowledge and beliefs about protein were investigated using an independent groups pretest - posttest design in which the effects of newsletters containing protein information on knowledge and beliefs about protein and protein intake was compared between groups.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.579611  DOI: Not available
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