Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.579505
Title: Illegal and unsustainable wildlife trade in Southeast Asia : the effectiveness of CITES as a conservation tool.
Author: Shepherd, Chris R.
Awarding Body: Oxford Brookes University
Current Institution: Oxford Brookes University
Date of Award: 2011
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Abstract:
Illegal and unsustainable wildlife trade is a growing threat to the survival of thousands of species worldwide. Perhaps nowhere is the growing threat of illegal and unsustainable wildlife trade more obvious than in Southeast Asia. In theory, some forms of sustainable exploitation of wildlife may be possible, however, controlling exploitation can prove to be difficult, and combating illegal and unsustainable trade does not appear to be a priority in Southeast Asia. In response to overexploitation of wildlife, much of which is destined for international trade, the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) came into effect in 1975. All countries in Southeast Asia are Party to CITES, with the exception of Timor Leste, and have national legislation in place as well to control harvest and trade to varying degrees. Here I examine, through a number of case studies, to illustrate the current effectiveness of CITES, and national laws, as conservation tools in Southeast Asia. I have attempted to present here information that highlights the scale and other relevant dynamics of the trade, focusing on the role Southeast Asia plays as a source, an import/re-export hub and as a consumer of wildlife. All of my case studies clearly illustrate that illegal and unsustainable trade in Southeast Asia is rife, carried out openly and poses a significant threat to the conservation many species, despite protection being provided, at least on paper, through national legislation and CITES.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.579505  DOI: Not available
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