Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.578264
Title: Workload control (WLC) : success in practice
Author: Huang , Yuan
Awarding Body: Lancaster University
Current Institution: Lancaster University
Date of Award: 2010
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Abstract:
Workload Control (WLC) is one of few Production Planning & Control (PPC) solutions appropriate for Make- To-Order (MTO) companies and Small & Medium sized Enterprises (SMEs), yet its successful implementation remains an enduring challenge. Much research attention has focused on developing the concept in a theoretical or simulation context; relatively little has focused on implementing the concept in practice, and more empirical evidence is needed on successful implementations. Of the few successful WLC implementations which have been published previously, the focus has been on the result of implementation while the process of implementation itself is still a 'black box'. Where more detail on the implementation process has been given in previous studies, evidence of effectiveness in practice has not been provided. To address this research gap, this thesis presents a successful implementation of a comprehensive WLC approach through action research; this is the first study which demonstrates the impact of WLC on performance in practice alongside a detailed account of the implementation process. Performance improvements observed include: reduced lead times; improvements in lateness and tardiness; reduced costs; improved internal and external co-ordination; and higher quality. In addition to details of this successful implementation, a wider body of evidence on the characteristics of MTO SMEs that affect WLC implementation has been obtained through a survey of 41 companies using semi-structured face-to-face interviews. This compensates for the limitation of a single case and adds an element of generality to the research findings. Thus, a generalised set of WLC specific implementation issues and an implementation strategy for the widespread adoption of WLC in practice has been developed.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.578264  DOI: Not available
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