Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.577873
Title: Beck's cognitive theory and the role of schemata in depression
Author: Poote, Aimee Elizabeth
Awarding Body: University of Birmingham
Current Institution: University of Birmingham
Date of Award: 2013
Availability of Full Text:
Access through EThOS:
Full text unavailable from EThOS. Thesis embargoed until 01 Dec 2023
Access through Institution:
Abstract:
Volume I includes a systematic literature review which aimed to synthesise and evaluate all research testing the role of early maladaptive schemas or core beliefs in depression as proposed by cognitive theory. The findings neither prove nor disprove the relationship. The empirical paper aimed to test the association between early maladaptive schemas in depression using a cross-sectional questionnaire design with diagnostic interviews. Early maladaptive schemas were associated with depression, did not moderate the relationship between stress and depression but did partially mediated the relationship between life stress (but not diabetes distress) and depressive symptoms. The findings partially support the role of early maladaptive schemas in depression. The executive summary summarises the systematic literature review and the empirical paper for stakeholders. Volume II includes the following clinical practice reports (i) a cognitive behavioural and psychodynamic formulation of obsessive compulsive disorder, (ii) a single-case experimental design evaluation of cognitive behavioural therapy for depression, (iii) an evaluation of compliance to depression guidelines, (iv) a cognitive behavioural formulation and intervention for obsessive compulsive disorder, and (v) an abstract summarising an oral report of cognitive behavioural therapy for social anxiety and traumatic brain injury.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Clin.Psy.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.577873  DOI: Not available
Keywords: BF Psychology
Share: