Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.576922
Title: Subversive property : law and the production of spaces of belonging
Author: Keenan, Sarah
ISNI:       0000 0004 2740 9578
Awarding Body: University of Kent
Current Institution: University of Kent
Date of Award: 2012
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Abstract:
This thesis develops a theory of property as a spatially contingent relation of belonging. Drawing on legal geography, critical geography and feminist theory, this spatial understanding of property provides a conceptually useful way of analysing a wide range of socia-legal issues. I argue that property occurs when a relation of belonging is 'held up' by space; that is, when the wider social processes, structures and networks that constitute space give force to that relation. 'Holding up' is a more diffuse, het erogeneous, spatial process than state recognit ion. The relation of belonging that is held up might be between a subject and an object, as property is conventionally understood, or it might be the constitutive relation between a part and a whole, as identity is often understood (for example the relation between a white person and whiteness). Understanding property in this way reveals its broad powers - how property constitutes subjectivities, shapes social and physical spaces, how it can operate subversively. This theory of property is explored in relation to two seemingly unconnected socia-legal issues: that of indigenous resistance to long leases of their land under Austral ia's Northern Territory National Emergency Response Act 2007 (Cth) and that of sexuality-based asylum claims made by women in Australia, Canada and Brita in. Analysing cases f rom t hese two socia-legal contexts, I argue that what was at stake in both contexts was the production of particu lar spaces of belonging; that is, spaces that hold up some relations of belonging and not others. In the final chapter I unpack the conceptual issue of how 'Space is connected to the subject. Exploring the concepts of 'taking space with you' and inheritance, I put forward an understanding of the complex connections that exist across space and time, and the way those connections affect and constitute the subject.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.576922  DOI: Not available
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