Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.574611
Title: The professional culture of Hollywood film sound : understanding labor politics and culture through practitioner discourse
Author: Andriano-Moore, Stephen Albert
Awarding Body: University of Nottingham
Current Institution: University of Nottingham
Date of Award: 2012
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Abstract:
Within the Hollywood film industry, sound is marginalized as the lowest status craft whose use and functions are often not considered until the last phase of filmmaking. The professional culture of Hollywood film sound is wrought with social, political and occupational misgivings as a result of sound's lower status. This thesis utilizes empirical research in an examination of the professional discourse of film sound practitioners to illuminate the issues, conditions and politics of labor that affect and form the professional culture of Hollywood film sound. Hollywood film sound practitioners critically analyze and theorize over social, occupational and political aspects of their work in email discussion groups such as the Sound Article List and the Sound Design List as well as within the professional journals of the Cinema Audio Society and the Motion Picture Editors Guild. The examination of professional discourse between Hollywood film sound practitioners reveals tension within the professional culture concerning filmmaking practices, work roles, professional identity, creative contribution, recognition and status. An in- depth case study considers the ways in which one leading practitioner, Oscar winning sound designer and re-recording mixer Randy Thorn, actively engages in discourse and activity invested in improving the marginalization of film sound and film sound practitioners. This investigation of industrial reflexive professional discourse and film sound organizations illuminates a dynamic picture of the professional culture of Hollywood film sound and how practitioners conceive and negotiate their professional identities, status within the industry and their impact on film.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.574611  DOI: Not available
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