Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.574485
Title: Postnatal mood disorders : do subtypes exist?
Author: Chisholm, Sarah Anne
Awarding Body: University of Essex
Current Institution: University of Essex
Date of Award: 2012
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Abstract:
Background: It has been suggested that two sub types of women with postnatal depression exist. These sub types are distinguishable based on the role that childbirth plays; as either a causative or a non-specific, trigger for the depressive episode. Evidence for these proposed subtypes has been inconsistent to date. Additionally, gaps in research have also been identified relating to the existence of possible subtypes of postnatal anxiety and the differential role of childbirth in triggering anxiety during the postnatal period. Method: 98 postnatal women completed a questionnaire designed to gather information relating to symptoms of depression, general and maternal-specific dysfunctional cognitions and symptoms of state and trait anxiety. A three-step cluster analysis technique was conducted as a method of exploring the existence of subtypes within the sample recruited. Following the identification of subtypes, further statistical analysis explored the stability and validity of the cluster solutions and characteristics of the subtypes. Results: Women with postnatal depression could be categorised into subtypes based on reports of general and maternal-specific dysfunctional cognitions: a) those experiencing a depressive episode specifically related to the experience of childbirth and motherhood, and b) those experiencing a non-specific depressive episode similar to depression experienced at other time of life. Additionally, a subtype of women with postnatal depression was found who did not report any dysfunctional cognitions. Women with postnatal anxiety could be categorised into subtypes based on reports of state and trait anxiety: a) those experiencing anxiety specifically related to the experience of childbirth and motherhood, and b) those experiencing a non-specific anxious episode similar to anxiety experienced at other times of life. Implications: As well as adding to the limited amount of research exploring subtypes of postnatal mood disorders, outcomes include implications for screening and treatment of postnatal depression and anxiety.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.Clin.Psychol.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.574485  DOI: Not available
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