Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.573769
Title: Anticompetitive effects of antidumping policy in Mexico
Author: Mendieta-Pacheco, Alfonso
Awarding Body: University of East Anglia
Current Institution: University of East Anglia
Date of Award: 2009
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Abstract:
Protectionism or retaliation is often argued as the motivation for the increasing use of anti-dumping measures by developing countries. In this research, I address other possible motives for the relentless use of these measures, such as collusion and trade deterrence. The main hypothesis is that price distortions generated by the introduction of anti-dumping policy serve as a departure point for the achievement of the collusive agreement. I develop a theoretical model in which a duopoly compete infinitely à la Bertrand in the importing market and anti-dumping policy serves as a mean to enforce and sustain the collusive outcome. Econometric analysis is performed in order to measure the impact of anti-dumping measures in the Mexican economy. Using a rich panel data of imports I investigate the trade restriction effects of anti-dumping, i.e. trade destruction and trade diversion. Testing for trade harassment effect is also achieved. In depth analysis of the debate between competition policy and anti-dumping policy reform is developed and some recommendations on the application of the competition policy framework are pursed in order to tackle the discriminatory use of the antidumping regime. It considers, however, the need of such an instrument in an environment where production in some sectors is characterized by advantageous conditions that can harm local industries. The research contributes to the literature on antidumping from a developing country point of view and is one of the few works that look in to the effects of antidumping policy in Mexico and puts emphasis on the domestic market structure of the petitioning country.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.573769  DOI: Not available
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