Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.573027
Title: Citizenship, diversity and education : an egalitarian pluralist approach
Author: Sardoc, Mitja
Awarding Body: Institute of Education, University of London
Current Institution: UCL Institute of Education (IOE)
Date of Award: 2012
Availability of Full Text:
Access from EThOS:
Access from Institution:
Abstract:
The terms of debate over the civic purposes of public education in a plurally diverse polity have been centred on the educational significance of engagement with forms of diversity that are both plural and heterogeneous. Central to these discussions have been various challenges, problems and difficulties related to the status, scope and justification of a citizenship education that would educate students so as to recognise and respect one another as free and equal members of a polity that is plural in its cultures, values and traditions. Yet, existing conceptions of citizenship education, I argue, both misrepresent our commitment to civic equality and also fail to treat with equal civic respect the normative significance of individuals' diverse commitments and allegiances. This thesis explores how and why a defensible conception of the civic purposes of public education is to be squared with the fair terms of engagement with diversity and how an alternative way of articulating the civic priorities and the individual interests in educating citizens as fully cooperating members of a polity is to be justified. I maintain that the challenges, problems and difficulties linked to the education of citizens so as to recognise and respect one another as free and equal members of a polity depend in large part on how we define and connect the two principled commitments associated with the liberal version of the rights-based conception of citizenship. In this thesis I outline and defend an egalitarian pluralist account of citizenship education that offers a distinctive response to the theoretical problems and practical difficulties in educating citizens so as to recognise and respect one another as free and equal members of a polity. I articulate a conception of the fair terms of engagement with diversity that would be of the greatest benefit to those students that are the least advantaged.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.573027  DOI: Not available
Share: