Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.572918
Title: Anisotropic colloids in soft matter environments : particle synthesis and interaction with interfaces
Author: Ballard, Nicholas
Awarding Body: University of Warwick
Current Institution: University of Warwick
Date of Award: 2012
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Abstract:
We have shown new applications and synthetic routes for polymer colloids in the field of home and personal care products by controlling polymer and/or colloidal architectures. Our initial aim was to develop functional particles that imparted beneficial properties to fibrous substrates and as such our first goal was to develop a method for depositing particles onto such surfaces. Chapter 2 describes the method by which we achieved this goal, namely adding a small amount of a low glass transition polymer to an otherwise non-adhesive polymer to enhance colloidal deposition. Following on from this work we looked into ways in which to impart desirable characteristics from the particles onto fibres. In Chapter 3 we describe how the use of a hydrazide functional monomer in polymer gels can provide a continuing slow release of fragrance molecules that reacts to the environment it is held in such that if the local fragrance concentration is low then more is released. In Chapter 4 we describe the synthesis of highly porous particles with controlled pore sizes and the use of such particles in oil absorption for applications in water-free cleaning systems. The particles are capable of carrying many times their own weight in oil and are shown to be reusable. In Chapter 5 we describe a computational model that predicts the ability of a particle to stabilize emulsions. The model is highly adaptable and can be used to predict the surface activity of almost any particle morphology. Chapter 6 builds on this work and described the synthesis of highly anisotropic polymer particles by templating preexisting structures and explains their surface activity, or lack thereof.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.572918  DOI: Not available
Keywords: QD Chemistry
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