Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.572886
Title: Surface active polymers as anti-infective and anti-biofouling materials
Author: Parker, Emily M.
Awarding Body: University of Oxford
Current Institution: University of Oxford
Date of Award: 2012
Availability of Full Text:
Access from EThOS:
Full text unavailable from EThOS. Restricted access.
Access from Institution:
Abstract:
This thesis is concerned with the chemical modification of polymers in the preparation of a library of materials which exhibit altered surface properties as a result of the surface chemical functionality, with particular emphasis on the development of materials that control biofouling and are antibacterial. Chemical modification of crosslinked polystyrene, in film and microsphere form, was carried out by carbene insertion followed by diazonium coupling. This provided access to a collection of materials with varying surface chemistry, whilst the bulk properties of the polystyrene substrates were maintained. Synthesis of the diaryldiazo and the diazonium salts used to perform the surface modifications is described, as well as the preparation and characterisation of the materials. Analysis of the ability of the materials to adsorb and bind the protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) is presented with data obtained from two methods of observation. Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation (QCM-D) and a protein assay based on the change in optical density of a BSA/PBS solution are used to demonstrate how the specific surface chemistry of the materials influences the ability to adsorb and bind protein. The behaviour of the materials was time dependent and was rationalised with respect to the surface water contact angle and the calculated parameters polar surface area and % polar surface area of the functional groups added to the surfaces. Finally, penicillin loaded materials were prepared and their antibacterial activity was tested against E. coli and S. aureus, demonstrating that the antibiotic is still active from within the polystyrene scaffold.
Supervisor: Moloney, Mark G. ; Foord, John Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.572886  DOI: Not available
Keywords: Chemistry & allied sciences ; Advanced materials ; Organic chemistry ; Organic synthesis ; Surface analysis ; Surface chemistry ; Surfaces ; Materials Sciences ; antibacterial surfaces ; organic chemical coatings ; surface chemistry control
Share: