Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.572866
Title: Causes and consequences of public and private acculturation preferences : views of minority and majority group members in three countries
Author: Tip, Linda Kirsten
Awarding Body: University of Sussex
Current Institution: University of Sussex
Date of Award: 2013
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Abstract:
This thesis explores antecedents and effects of public and private acculturation preferences of minority and majority group members. By differentiating between acculturation in public domains (outside one's home) and private domains (at home), and by reporting experiments, longitudinal data, and qualitative data, this thesis provides fuller insights in the acculturation process than previous literature, which has predominantly been correlational and lacked domain specificity. Chapter one provides a critical overview of the acculturation literature. Chapter two describes the results of three experiments investigating domain specificity in meta-perceptions of acculturation. In Study 1, we manipulated how Muslims were perceived to acculturate in public domains, and investigated how this affected own acculturation preferences and affective reactions of British majority members. Study 2 was similar, but perceived private acculturation preferences were manipulated too. In Study 3, we examined how the public and private acculturation preferences which British majority members were perceived to have affected own acculturation preferences and affective reactions of Muslim minority members. Chapter three presents Studies 4 and 5 which experimentally investigated the effect of perceived ingroup norms about acculturation preferences for public and private life domains. Dependent variables were majority members' own acculturation preferences for public and private domains, their investment in acculturation, and positive affect felt towards their own ingroup members. This was studied in both England and Chile. Chapter four looks into effects of public and private acculturation of Muslim minority members on their well-being and intergroup emotions. Both cross-sectional and longitudinal data are presented from two samples: Muslims in England (Study 6) and Muslims in the Netherlands (Study 7). Chapter five reports interviews with fourteen Muslims living in England in which they explain their reasons for their public and private acculturation choices (Study 8). Chapter six summarises the findings, and discusses implications and directions for future research.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.572866  DOI: Not available
Keywords: HM1106 Interpersonal relations. Social behaviour
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