Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.571878
Title: Cardiometabolic risk in 10 to 11 year old children : the impacts of physical activity, cardiorespiratory fitness, body composition and lifestyle education
Author: Gobbi, Rebecca
Awarding Body: Liverpool John Moores University
Current Institution: Liverpool John Moores University
Date of Award: 2012
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Abstract:
The aim of this thesis was to investigate the impacts of physical activity (PA), cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF), body composition and lifestyle education on cardiometabolic (CM) risk in 10-11 year old children. This broad aim was approached using three studies. Studies 1 and 2 were cross sectional observational studies, and study 3 was a clustered randomised control trial, with intervention effects assessed at post intervention and again at 8 to 10 weeks after the intervention. Initially, in the first cross sectional study (Chapter 4) the relationships between non- invasive (LV Mass, E/A, E'/A', E/E', trunk fat mass, whole body fat mass) and invasive CM risk markers (CRP, HOMA-IR, adiponectin, TC: HDL-C), and between all risk markers and CRF (V02 peak), time spent sedentary, moderate to vigorous intensity PA (MVPA) and vigorous PA (VPA) were investigated in 10-11 year old children (n=62). The key findings were significant but generally weak relationships present between some of the non- invasive and invasive markers of CM risk and risk markers also had significant correlations with measures of CRF and PA. CRP was significantly positively correlated with whole body fat in boys (rho = 0.486, p < 0.05) and girls (rho = 0.485 , p < O.Ol) and with trunk fat mass in boys (rho = 0.384, p < 0.05) and girls (rho =0.489, p < O.Ol). Adiponectin was negatively correlated with whole body fat (rho = -0.446, p < 0.05, and R=-0.697, p < O.Ol) and trunk fat mass (rho = -0.614, p < O.Ol; rho = -0.475, p < O.Ol) in boys and girls respectively, and in girls adiponectin also correlated positively with E'/A' (r=0.356, p < 0.05). In boys only, TC:HDL-C was positively correlated with whole body fat (rho =0.407, p < 0.01) and trunk fat mass (rho =0.391, p < 0.05). ; V02Peakwas negatively correlated with CRPin boys (Rho = -0.492, p < 0.05) and HOMA-IR in girls (Rho =-0.522, p < 0.01). V02Peak was also negatively correlated with whole body fat (rho =-0.515, p < 0.01; r=-0.697, p < O.Ol) and trunk fat mass (rho=-0.494, p < 0.05; rho =-0.706, p < 0.01) in boys and girls respectively. Both MVPA and VPA correlated negatively with TC: HDL-C in girls (rho= -0.396, p < 0.05; rho =-0.428, p < 0.05) and MVPA correlated with whole body fat (rho= -0.602, p < O.Ol) and trunk fat mass (rho=-0.65, p < 0.01) in boys. VPA also correlated with whole body fat in girls (rho= - 0.544, p < O.Ol) and with trunk fat mass in both boys (rho= -0.428, p < 0.05) and girls (rho= - 0.468, p < 0.01). Time spent sedentary had a positive correlation with whole body fat in boys (rho = 0.429, p < 0.05). This study demonstrated that risk factors clustered in individuals and that relationships were present between invasive and non-invasive markers of cardiometabolic risk, and provided preliminary evidence to investigate this phenomenon further. The correlations described in this study suggest a clustered risk score which includes both invasive and non-invasive measures may add value to predicting overall risk. The second cross sectional study (Chapter 5) investigated clustered CM risk, by combining invasive markers with non-invasive 'pre-clinical' markers of CM risk into a clustered risk score, in a different cohort of 10 - 11 year old children. Clustered risk scores were negatively correlated with CRFand PA. V02 peakshowed a moderate negative correlation with CRSA (r=-0.57, p < 0.01) and CRS B (r= -0.60, p < O.Ol) VPA showed a moderate negative correlation with CRSA (r= -0.51, p= 0.01) and CRSB (r= -0.50, p=O.Ol). MVPA showed a moderate negative correlation with CRSA (r= -0.44, p= 0.03) and CRSB (r= -0.41, p=0.04). Sedentary time showed a moderate positive correlatcorrelation with CRSA (r= 0.414, p= 0.049). The evidence provided by these two observational studies, Study 1 (Chapter 4) and Study 2 (Chapter 5), along with other literature, as discussed throughout this thesis, gave rationale for an intervention with the aim to reduce negative lifestyle behaviours, of low levels of PA, high levels of sedentary behaviour and poor nutritional balance, increase CRF and maintain a healthy body weight.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.571878  DOI: Not available
Keywords: RC1200 Sports Medicine ; RJ101 Child Health. Child health services
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