Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.571693
Title: Diaspora Judeans and proselytes in early Roman Palestine : a study of ethnic, social and cultural boundaries
Author: Lee, Reuben Y. T.
Awarding Body: University of Aberdeen
Current Institution: University of Aberdeen
Date of Award: 2013
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Abstract:
This research explores the ethnic, social, and cultural boundaries in Judaea and the nearby non-Judaean settlements in Palestine from 40 BCE till 70 CE, showing that the boundaries there were no less complex than those in the Diaspora outside the region. A large number of scholarly works have investigated the boundaries and identities of the Diaspora Judaeans outside Palestine, paying attention to their assimilation into — and resistance against — the non-Judaean cultures and social environments. Focusing on the following groups, I argue that Diaspora Judaeans and proselytes still encountered different sorts of boundaries even if they were in or near the predominantly Judaean region: a. local Diaspora Judaeans residing in the Hellenistic cities on the coast and in the Decapolis b. Judaean pilgrims coming from the Diaspora to Judaea c. Judaean immigrants settling in Judaea from the Diaspora d. proselytes making pilgrimages to or settling in Judaea from the Diaspora Certain experiences and identities of the Diaspora Judaeans and proselytes coming from diverse geographical origins in the Mediterranean and Near East were very different from those of the Judaeans in Judaea. These Diaspora Judaeans might have been considered socially and culturally foreign to the local Judaeans when they visited or lived in Judaea. At the same time, some of them were accepted into the local Judaean circle in various levels because of their common identities, lineages, and traditions. The ethnic, social, and cultural boundaries in Palestine were complicated, as they were not only negotiated among different ethnic groups, but also among those belonging to the same ethnic group and sharing certain traditions. The presence of Diaspora Judaeans and proselytes led to certain boundaries that were unique to this region.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: University of Aberdeen ; York University (Toronto ; Ont.)
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.571693  DOI: Not available
Keywords: Jewish diaspora ; Palestine ; Jews
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