Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.570710
Title: Migrant remittances from the ethnic Albanian diaspora : evidence from Albania and Kosovo
Author: Korovilas, James Peter
Awarding Body: University of the West of England, Bristol
Current Institution: University of the West of England, Bristol
Date of Award: 2012
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Abstract:
This thesis considers the recent waves of outward migration from Albania and Kosovo, and the establishment of 'remittance dependent' economies in these countries. Two key issues relating to this state of 'remittance dependency' are considered in this thesis: Firstly, whether the flow of remittances into these two economies can be sustained over time, despite the fact that immigration restrictions in the main countries of the diaspora prevent the arrival of new 'remittance active' migrants from Albania and Kosovo. On this issue the findings in this thesis support the view that informal migration is both practical and economically viable. Therefore, the lack of legal migration options does not present a significant obstacle to any future flow of migration into the diaspora, which is needed to maintain the stock of remittance active migrants in the diaspora. Secondly, whether the flow of remittances into these two economies has resulted in any 'distortions' of the domestic economy, and whether these 'distortions' have had the effect of perpetuating the condition of 'remittance dependency'. On this issue, the rise and subsequent collapse of Albania's pyramid investment schemes was shown to be linked to the receipt of migrant remittances, with the collapse of these schemes prompting further waves of migration and further flows of remittances. However, the main emphasis of this thesis is on the distorting effects of remittances on the economy of Kosovo, here the receipt of remittances is shown to have a 'Dutch disease' effect upon the domestic economy, restricting the development of the traded goods sector and therefore perpetuating the condition of 'remittance dependency'.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.570710  DOI: Not available
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