Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.569666
Title: Video content analysis for automated detection and tracking of humans in CCTV surveillance applications
Author: Tawiah, Thomas Andzi-Quainoo
Awarding Body: Brunel University
Current Institution: Brunel University
Date of Award: 2010
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Abstract:
The problems of achieving high detection rate with low false alarm rate for human detection and tracking in video sequence, performance scalability, and improving response time are addressed in this thesis. The underlying causes are the effect of scene complexity, human-to-human interactions, scale changes, and scene background-human interactions. A two-stage processing solution, namely, human detection, and human tracking with two novel pattern classifiers is presented. Scale independent human detection is achieved by processing in the wavelet domain using square wavelet features. These features used to characterise human silhouettes at different scales are similar to rectangular features used in [Viola 2001]. At the detection stage two detectors are combined to improve detection rate. The first detector is based on shape-outline of humans extracted from the scene using a reduced complexity outline extraction algorithm. A Shape mismatch measure is used to differentiate between the human and the background class. The second detector uses rectangular features as primitives for silhouette description in the wavelet domain. The marginal distribution of features collocated at a particular position on a candidate human (a patch of the image) is used to describe statistically the silhouette. Two similarity measures are computed between a candidate human and the model histograms of human and non human classes. The similarity measure is used to discriminate between the human and the non human class. At the tracking stage, a tracker based on joint probabilistic data association filter (JPDAF) for data association, and motion correspondence is presented. Track clustering is used to reduce hypothesis enumeration complexity. Towards improving response time with increase in frame dimension, scene complexity, and number of channels; a scalable algorithmic architecture and operating accuracy prediction technique is presented. A scheduling strategy for improving the response time and throughput by parallel processing is also presented.
Supervisor: Lea, M.; Stonham, J. Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.569666  DOI: Not available
Keywords: Shape-based discrimination ; Biorthogonal wavelets analysis ; Feed forward neural networks ; Data association filter ; Performance scalability
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