Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.569292
Title: The effect of induced mood on interpretation biases in high and low trait anxious participants
Author: Teape, Lynda A.
Awarding Body: University of East Anglia
Current Institution: University of East Anglia
Date of Award: 2009
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Abstract:
Empirical research has demonstrated that interpretation biases have a causal effect on levels of anxiety (Mathews & Mackintosh, 2000). The dual process model of mood regulation (Forgas & Ciarocchi, 2002) however proposes that there would be an interaction between interpretation biases and anxiety. Within this model, clinical anxiety can be understood as a failure to evoke effortful, mood regulatory strategies. No previous research has explored the interaction between interpretation biases and mood, in both high and low trait anxious individuals, within a dual process model framework. Experiment One Interpretation biases using the ambiguous scenario method, were measured following a positive mood induction in both high (n=17) and low (n=21) trait anxious participants, and subsequent effects on high and low positive affect were measured. Both groups demonstrated a mood congruent response bias, however this did not serve to maintain changes in positive affect. The theoretical implications of these findings and the limitations of the methodology are discussed. Experiment Two The findings of experiment one were extended upon, with interpretation biases being measured following an anxious mood induction, in high (n=15) and low (n=20) trait anxious participants. Both high and low anxious participants demonstrated an increasingly mood incongruent interpretation bias over time. There was some evidence of a more positive response bias amongst low trait anxious participants. A subsequent decrease in negative affect was interpreted as evidence of mood decay rather than mood regulation. The reported xviii results are discussed in relation to the dual process model and evidence for an interaction between interpretation biases and anxiety. General Discussion The results of this study provide evidence of the benefits of exploring cognitive biases within a dual process model framework. The failure to find differences between high and low anxious participants is discussed in relation to methodological limitations with suggestions for areas of further research.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.Clin.Psychol.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.569292  DOI: Not available
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