Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.569252
Title: The shaping of Britain's China policy 1970-1976
Author: McDermott, Emily Jane
Awarding Body: University of Liverpool
Current Institution: University of Liverpool
Date of Award: 2011
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Abstract:
This thesis offers a diplomatic study of Britain's relations with the People's Republic of China under the Government of Edward Heath. It was during his premiership that diplomatic relations were upgraded to Ambassadorial level. Through exploring the diplomatic exchanges between the two countries it examines how Britain's post-Cultural Revolution relationship I with China was rehabilitated to allow, in March 1972, the establishment of full diplomatic I relations and the effect that this event had on the future of this bilateral relationship. This study also contributes to the understanding of the processes by which British foreign policy was conceived and executed. It offers an analysis of the aims and ambitions of the Foreign Office during Heath's Government and compares it to those of the same department during the succeeding Wilson Government. It seeks to establish the relative roles of individual civil servants and ministers and the extent to which the two political parties put their individual stamp on the policy during their periods in office. This detailed assessment of the developing bilateral relationship over this important time provides a valuable case study of the realities of policy creation and implementation. It also offers an alternative view to the orthodox opinion that Heath's foreign policy was essentially Eurocentric. Although there are studies of Sino-British relations up until 1972, the relationship thereafter has been neglected by scholars compared with other aspects of British foreign policy during this period. The literature then tends to take up the story from 1978 and Chinese President Deng Xiaoping's "open door policy". This account of Britain's China policy is based largely on government sources at The National Archives. Private papers, memoirs and secondary sources have also been consulted
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.569252  DOI: Not available
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