Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.569164
Title: Labour internationalism : an exploration of the grassroots' perspective
Author: Ryland, Rebecca Amie
Awarding Body: University of Liverpool
Current Institution: University of Liverpool
Date of Award: 2011
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Abstract:
Over recent decades UK trade unions have faced a period of uncertainty due to the ongoing political, economic and cultural shifts in the industrial relations landscape. Many have queried the contemporary role of trade unions arguing they are antiquated and superfluous organisations who have not engaged with new norms that hold that collective organisational principles of solidarity have been replaced by individualised thinking and practice. A variety of strategies have been employed to reverse declines in membership levels and bargaining power but with limited success. The outlook is not entirely bleak however with many turning to what is often referred to as the 'saviour of the labour movement' (Mazur, 2000): a 'new' labour internationalism. Trade unions have a long history of engagement in labour internationalism, however there has been limited investigation into how union initiatives encouraging internationalism and internationalist identifications are received, understood and interpreted at the grassroots, by union members whose subscriptions sustain union activity in the first place. By developing upon a growing expanse of literature within the field of labour geography which seeks to place the politics of labour at the forefront of its analysis, this thesis will explore a case study of UNISON North West, identifying how labour internationalism is understood, expressed and conducted in daily practice. Analyses will be based upon members' personal narratives thus reasserting the importance of worker agency.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.569164  DOI: Not available
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