Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.567933
Title: Implementation of aid initiatives in post-conflict reconstruction and development : Afghanistan 2002-2008
Author: Kadirova, Diloro
ISNI:       0000 0003 8369 8362
Awarding Body: Oxford University
Current Institution: University of Oxford
Date of Award: 2012
Availability of Full Text:
Full text unavailable from EThOS.
Please contact the current institution’s library for further details.
Abstract:
This study examines what drives success in the implementation of international reconstruction and development aid projects in a post-conflict environment. It poses three key questions: 1) How important is the national government's support for project success in post-conflict reconstruction and development? 2) What role does donor coordination on the ground play for project success? and 3) What other factors explain project success? To address these questions, I design and test a novel explanatory model of effective project implementation in post-conflict reconstruction and development, using an original data set of 124 projects undertaken by six major multilateral and bilateral aid agencies in Afghanistan during 2002-2008. Study results highlight two factors that appear to consistently influence project success: the national government's support, and the quality of project leadership (i.e project manager or project coordinator) on the international project implementation side. Most interestingly, the combination of national government's support and strong project leadership considerably increases the likelihood of project success, as well as the level of success achieved. Donor coordination arrangements made at the stage of project implementation appear to be a generally weak predictor of project success. The qualitative findings of the study illustrate in what way various project success factors in the model impact on project success. Notably, they identify and add to the conventional 'instrumental' qualities of leadership the qualities of 'moral' leadership, such as ability to build trust and respect with national counterparts based on the record of competence, dedication, and delivery
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.567933  DOI: Not available
Share: