Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.566258
Title: Culture & competition : a study of supplementary education in Taiwan
Author: Courtenay, Mark Jonathan
Awarding Body: Durham University
Current Institution: Durham University
Date of Award: 2013
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Abstract:
Abstract The phenomenon of supplementary education is a major part of the educational landscape of Taiwan and other countries of East Asia. The scale and characterization of this phenomenon is not clear, despite its major position in the educational system of Taiwan. The aim of this thesis is to describe the scale and character of supplementary education in Taiwan, particularly at the level of Elementary School, and further to investigate what motivates Taiwanese Elementary school age children and their parents to enroll in supplementary education activities. The research further attempts to explore how these findings reflect on possible cultural differences in motivation in education. In order to adequately account for cultural aspects of the motivations and perceptions of parents and students, the research uses a combination of interview and survey methods, involving Taiwanese elementary school teachers, parents of elementary school children, and university students, concerning their experience and observations of the phenomenon of supplementary education in a city located in southern Taiwan. The findings confirm the large scale of supplementary education activity from early in elementary school, with a majority of students reporting participation. Interviews and surveys revealed a wide range of reasons for the uptake of supplementary education, and support the conclusion that the level of participation is appreciably dependent on cultural factors which tend to magnify the competitive aspects of the education system. While teachers described distorting effects of supplementary education, students also offered some positive perceptions of supplementary education, particularly in English language learning. The study also included a survey of achievement goal orientation, with the 2x2 achievement goal construct accounting for less variance than in the original US sample, raising questions concerning cultural differences in motivation. Implications for educators and education policy are discussed, and suggestions for further research are also offered.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ed.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.566258  DOI: Not available
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