Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.566133
Title: Understanding health beliefs in relation to chronic disease and self-management in a socio-economically disadvantaged multi-ethnic population
Author: Sidhu, Manbinder Singh
Awarding Body: University of Birmingham
Current Institution: University of Birmingham
Date of Award: 2013
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Abstract:
The development of lay-led chronic disease self-management programmes (CDSMPs) is considered to be an effective approach to help people self-manage chronic diseases. Current studies have, in their majority, been conducted with White participants, and it remains unclear whether CDSMPs lead to similar results for other ethnic groups, particularly high risk groups such as South Asians. This mixed methods research was constructed in two phases. Phase 1 consists of an evaluation of the Chronic Disease Educator (CDE) programme (a lay-led CDSMP). CDEs felt their role often changed during sessions, between a facilitator and educator, and were able to make content culturally applicable. Participants appreciated the group format of the programme. South Asian participants welcomed members of their community delivering the programme in community languages and were much more likely to report gaining new knowledge from attending the programme in comparison to other ethnic groups. Phase 2 consists of exploring current health beliefs with regards to chronic disease and selfmanagement within the Sikh community. Individuals from the Sikh community accessed a range of systems of support which included traditional health services, alternative remedies, the family and the community, all of which affected lifestyle, disease, symptom and emotional management.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.566133  DOI: Not available
Keywords: RA Public aspects of medicine
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