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Title: Variation in Y chromosome, mitochondrial DNA and labels of identity on Ethiopia
Author: Plaster, C. A.
Awarding Body: University College London (University of London)
Current Institution: University College London (University of London)
Date of Award: 2011
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Abstract:
There is a paucity of genetic studies of Ethiopia. This thesis aims to establish the extent and distribution of variation in NRY and mtDNA genetic markers as well as ethnic and linguistic labels of identity 45 ethnic groups. A wide range of NRY and mtDNA haplogroups were observed, including both those typically observed in Africa and those more frequently observed outside Africa. Significant correlations were revealed between NRY and mtDNA diversity. Nearly all ethnic groups were significantly differentiated from each other, although the pattern of similarities indicates some recent gene flow between northern ethnic groups and some groups to the south. Significant correlations were observed between almost all measures of linguistic and ethnic similarity and measures of NRY and mtDNA genetic distance. A wide range of values for diversity of sample donors' ethnic and linguistic identity was observed across groups. There was no evidence that the language of the sample donor is more likely to be inherited from parents of one sex rather than the other. There was a general decrease in the proportion of sample donors speaking the traditional language of their ethnic groups compared with the donor's parents and grandparents, with a corresponding increase in the proportion of sample donors speaking Amhara as a first language. Restricting analysis to samples from donors with ethnic identity in common with their parents and grandparents had significant effects on the degree of genetic distinctiveness of ethnic groups. Increasing the level of resolution of NRY and mtDNA haplotypes did not substantially alter the patterns of diversity and distance observed in and amongst ethnic groups. This thesis makes an important contribution to understanding the distribution of genetic diversity in Ethiopia.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.565475  DOI: Not available
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