Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.564150
Title: Exploring self help interventions following traumatic experiences
Author: Blainey, Sarah
Awarding Body: University of Sheffield
Current Institution: University of Sheffield
Date of Award: 2012
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Abstract:
The literature relating to interventions aimed at reducing or ameliorating distress after experiencing a post traumatic event was reviewed. Both preventative and intervention approaches have been investigated. No evidence was found for the effectiveness of population wide approaches to reduce later development of post traumatic stress symptoms. Interventions for early or sub-clinical levels of distress following a traumatic event were more effective. Good quality evidence only existed for cognitive behavioural approaches, although writing approaches appeared promising. All studies reviewed had a number of conceptual issues and methodological difficulties, including difficulties with defining post traumatic distress and outcome measurement. Areas for future research, including qualitative exploration of participants' experiences of such approaches, are discussed. Qualitative exploration of the experience of writing about a traumatic experience and sharing this online was undertaken. Twelve women were interviewed both after writing and after posting their writing online. Template analysis was used to develop nine themes reflecting a journey from deciding to write and share their stories, the process of writing and the impact of writing and sharing their stories online, both immediate and delayed. An overarching theme developed reflecting some women's feelings that they may not be justified in feeling traumatised. The contribution of these results to the understanding of writing about traumatic experiences and sharing these online is discussed, along with the implications for self help and support groups. Directions for further research are suggested, including further understanding of factors that may impact on the utility of writing about a traumatic event.
Supervisor: Slade, Pauline Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.Clin.Psy.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.564150  DOI: Not available
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